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Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

(often shortened to CPT II deficiency)
Reviewed June 2014

What is CPT II deficiency?

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from using certain fats for energy, particularly during periods without food (fasting). There are three main types of CPT II deficiency: a lethal neonatal form, a severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form, and a myopathic form.

The lethal neonatal form of CPT II deficiency becomes apparent soon after birth. Infants with this form of the disorder develop respiratory failure, seizures, liver failure, a weakened heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), and an irregular heart beat (arrhythmia). Affected individuals also have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and a low level of ketones, which are produced during the breakdown of fats and used for energy. Together these signs are called hypoketotic hypoglycemia. In many cases, the brain and kidneys are also structurally abnormal. Infants with the lethal neonatal form of CPT II deficiency usually live for a few days to a few months.

The severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form of CPT II deficiency affects the liver, heart, and muscles. Signs and symptoms usually appear within the first year of life. This form involves recurring episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia, seizures, an enlarged liver (hepatomegaly), cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmia. Problems related to this form of CPT II deficiency can be triggered by periods of fasting or by illnesses such as viral infections. Individuals with the severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form of CPT II deficiency are at risk for liver failure, nervous system damage, coma, and sudden death.

The myopathic form is the least severe type of CPT II deficiency. This form is characterized by recurrent episodes of muscle pain (myalgia) and weakness and is associated with the breakdown of muscle tissue (rhabdomyolysis). The destruction of muscle tissue releases a protein called myoglobin, which is processed by the kidneys and released in the urine (myoglobinuria). Myoglobin causes the urine to be red or brown. This protein can also damage the kidneys, in some cases leading to life-threatening kidney failure. Episodes of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be triggered by exercise, stress, exposure to extreme temperatures, infections, or fasting. The first episode usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Most people with the myopathic form of CPT II deficiency have no signs or symptoms of the disorder between episodes.

How common is CPT II deficiency?

CPT II deficiency is a rare disorder. The lethal neonatal form has been described in at least 18 families, while the severe infantile hepatocardiomuscular form has been identified in approximately 30 families. The myopathic form occurs most frequently, with more than 300 reported cases.

What genes are related to CPT II deficiency?

Mutations in the CPT2 gene cause CPT II deficiency. This gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2. This enzyme is essential for fatty acid oxidation, which is the multistep process that breaks down (metabolizes) fats and converts them into energy. Fatty acid oxidation takes place within mitochondria, which are the energy-producing centers in cells. A group of fats called long-chain fatty acids must be attached to a substance known as carnitine to enter mitochondria. Once these fatty acids are inside mitochondria, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 removes the carnitine and prepares them for fatty acid oxidation. Fatty acids are a major source of energy for the heart and muscles. During periods of fasting, fatty acids are also an important energy source for the liver and other tissues.

Mutations in the CPT2 gene reduce the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2. Without enough of this enzyme, carnitine is not removed from long-chain fatty acids. As a result, these fatty acids cannot be metabolized to produce energy. Reduced energy production can lead to some of the features of CPT II deficiency, such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, myalgia, and weakness. Fatty acids and long-chain acylcarnitines (fatty acids still attached to carnitine) may also build up in cells and damage the liver, heart, and muscles. This abnormal buildup causes the other signs and symptoms of the disorder.

Related Gene(s)

Changes in this gene are associated with carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

  • CPT2

How do people inherit CPT II deficiency?

This condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, which means both copies of the gene in each cell have mutations. The parents of an individual with an autosomal recessive condition each carry one copy of the mutated gene, but they typically do not show signs and symptoms of the condition.

Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of CPT II deficiency?

These resources address the diagnosis or management of CPT II deficiency and may include treatment providers.

  • Baby's First Test (http://www.babysfirsttest.org/newborn-screening/conditions/carnitine-palmitoyltransferase-type-ii-deficiency)
  • FOD (Fatty Oxidation Disorders) Family Support Group: Diagnostic Approach to Disorders of Fat Oxidation - Information for Clinicians (http://www.fodsupport.org/clinicians.htm)
  • Gene Review: Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1253)
  • Genetic Testing Registry: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C0342790)
  • Genetic Testing Registry: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency, infantile (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C1833511)
  • Genetic Testing Registry: CARNITINE PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE II DEFICIENCY, LATE-ONSET (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C1833508)
  • Genetic Testing Registry: CARNITINE PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE II DEFICIENCY, LETHAL NEONATAL (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/conditions/C1833518)

You might also find information on the diagnosis or management of CPT II deficiency in Educational resources (http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/carnitine-palmitoyltransferase-ii-deficiency/show/Educational+resources) and Patient support (http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/carnitine-palmitoyltransferase-ii-deficiency/show/Patient+support).

General information about the diagnosis (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/consult/diagnosis) and management (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/consult/treatment) of genetic conditions is available in the Handbook. Read more about genetic testing (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/testing), particularly the difference between clinical tests and research tests (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/testing/researchtesting).

To locate a healthcare provider, see How can I find a genetics professional in my area? (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/consult/findingprofessional) in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about CPT II deficiency?

You may find the following resources about CPT II deficiency helpful. These materials are written for the general public.

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for healthcare professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for CPT II deficiency?

  • carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 deficiency
  • CPT2 deficiency

For more information about naming genetic conditions, see the Genetics Home Reference Condition Naming Guidelines (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/ConditionNameGuide) and How are genetic conditions and genes named? (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/mutationsanddisorders/naming) in the Handbook.

What if I still have specific questions about CPT II deficiency?

Ask the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/).

What glossary definitions help with understanding CPT II deficiency?

acids ; arrhythmia ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; breakdown ; cardiomyopathy ; carnitine ; cell ; coma ; deficiency ; enzyme ; fasting ; fatty acids ; gene ; hypoglycemia ; inherited ; kidney ; liver failure ; mitochondria ; myalgia ; myoglobin ; myoglobinuria ; neonatal ; nervous system ; newborn screening ; oxidation ; protein ; recessive ; respiratory ; rhabdomyolysis ; screening ; stress ; tissue

You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary (http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/glossary).

References

  • Anichini A, Fanin M, Vianey-Saban C, Cassandrini D, Fiorillo C, Bruno C, Angelini C. Genotype-phenotype correlations in a large series of patients with muscle type CPT II deficiency. Neurol Res. 2011 Jan;33(1):24-32. doi: 10.1179/016164110X12767786356390. Epub 2010 Aug 31. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20810031?dopt=Abstract)
  • Corti S, Bordoni A, Ronchi D, Musumeci O, Aguennouz M, Toscano A, Lamperti C, Bresolin N, Comi GP. Clinical features and new molecular findings in Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency. J Neurol Sci. 2008 Mar 15;266(1-2):97-103. Epub 2007 Oct 23. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17936304?dopt=Abstract)
  • Deschauer M, Wieser T, Zierz S. Muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency: clinical and molecular genetic features and diagnostic aspects. Arch Neurol. 2005 Jan;62(1):37-41. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15642848?dopt=Abstract)
  • Fanin M, Anichini A, Cassandrini D, Fiorillo C, Scapolan S, Minetti C, Cassanello M, Donati MA, Siciliano G, D'Amico A, Lilliu F, Bruno C, Angelini C. Allelic and phenotypic heterogeneity in 49 Italian patients with the muscle form of CPT-II deficiency. Clin Genet. 2012 Sep;82(3):232-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2011.01786.x. Epub 2011 Oct 12. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21913903?dopt=Abstract)
  • Gene Review: Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1253)
  • Illsinger S, Lücke T, Peter M, Ruiter JP, Wanders RJ, Deschauer M, Handig I, Wuyts W, Das AM. Carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 2 deficiency: novel mutations and relevance of newborn screening. Am J Med Genet A. 2008 Nov 15;146A(22):2925-8. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.32545. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18925671?dopt=Abstract)
  • Isackson PJ, Bennett MJ, Lichter-Konecki U, Willis M, Nyhan WL, Sutton VR, Tein I, Vladutiu GD. CPT2 gene mutations resulting in lethal neonatal or severe infantile carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. Mol Genet Metab. 2008 Aug;94(4):422-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ymgme.2008.05.002. Epub 2008 Jun 11. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18550408?dopt=Abstract)
  • Longo N, Amat di San Filippo C, Pasquali M. Disorders of carnitine transport and the carnitine cycle. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2006 May 15;142C(2):77-85. Review. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16602102?dopt=Abstract)
  • Olpin SE, Afifi A, Clark S, Manning NJ, Bonham JR, Dalton A, Leonard JV, Land JM, Andresen BS, Morris AA, Muntoni F, Turnbull D, Pourfarzam M, Rahman S, Pollitt RJ. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2003;26(6):543-57. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14605500?dopt=Abstract)
  • Wieser T, Deschauer M, Olek K, Hermann T, Zierz S. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency: molecular and biochemical analysis of 32 patients. Neurology. 2003 Apr 22;60(8):1351-3. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12707442?dopt=Abstract)
  • Ørngreen MC, Dunø M, Ejstrup R, Christensen E, Schwartz M, Sacchetti M, Vissing J. Fuel utilization in subjects with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 gene mutations. Ann Neurol. 2005 Jan;57(1):60-6. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15622536?dopt=Abstract)

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/consult/findingprofessional) in the Handbook.

 
Reviewed: June 2014
Published: December 22, 2014