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Cyclic neutropenia

Cyclic neutropenia

Reviewed January 2012

What is cyclic neutropenia?

Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and other health problems in affected individuals. People with this condition have recurrent episodes of neutropenia during which there is a shortage (deficiency) of neutrophils. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that plays a role in inflammation and in fighting infection. The episodes of neutropenia are apparent at birth or soon afterward. For most affected individuals, neutropenia recurs every 21 days and lasts about 3 to 5 days.

Neutropenia makes it more difficult for the body to fight off pathogens such as bacteria and viruses, so people with cyclic neutropenia typically develop recurrent infections of the sinuses, respiratory tract, and skin. Additionally, people with this condition often develop open sores (ulcers) in the mouth and colon, inflammation of the throat (pharyngitis) and gums (gingivitis), recurrent fever, or abdominal pain. People with cyclic neutropenia have these health problems only during episodes of neutropenia. At times when their neutrophil levels are normal, they are not at an increased risk of infection and inflammation.

How common is cyclic neutropenia?

Cyclic neutropenia is a rare condition and is estimated to occur in 1 in 1 million individuals worldwide.

What genes are related to cyclic neutropenia?

Mutations in the ELANE gene cause cyclic neutropenia. The ELANE gene provides instructions for making a protein called neutrophil elastase, which is found in neutrophils. When the body starts an immune response to fight an infection, neutrophils release neutrophil elastase. This protein then modifies the function of certain cells and proteins to help fight the infection.

ELANE gene mutations that cause cyclic neutropenia lead to an abnormal neutrophil elastase protein that seems to retain some of its function. However, neutrophils that produce abnormal neutrophil elastase protein appear to have a shorter lifespan than normal neutrophils. The shorter neutrophil lifespan is thought to be responsible for the cyclic nature of this condition. When the affected neutrophils die early, there is a period in which there is a shortage of neutrophils because it takes time for the body to replenish its supply.

Read more about the ELANE gene.

How do people inherit cyclic neutropenia?

Cyclic neutropenia is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder.

In most cases, an affected person inherits the mutation from one affected parent. Other cases result from new mutations in the gene and occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family.

Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of cyclic neutropenia?

These resources address the diagnosis or management of cyclic neutropenia and may include treatment providers.

You might also find information on the diagnosis or management of cyclic neutropenia in Educational resources and Patient support.

General information about the diagnosis and management of genetic conditions is available in the Handbook. Read more about genetic testing, particularly the difference between clinical tests and research tests.

To locate a healthcare provider, see How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about cyclic neutropenia?

You may find the following resources about cyclic neutropenia helpful. These materials are written for the general public.

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for healthcare professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for cyclic neutropenia?

  • cyclic hematopoesis
  • cyclic leucopenia
  • periodic neutropenia

For more information about naming genetic conditions, see the Genetics Home Reference Condition Naming Guidelines and How are genetic conditions and genes named? in the Handbook.

What if I still have specific questions about cyclic neutropenia?

Where can I find general information about genetic conditions?

What glossary definitions help with understanding cyclic neutropenia?

autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; bacteria ; cell ; colon ; deficiency ; fever ; gene ; gums ; immune response ; infection ; inflammation ; mutation ; neutropenia ; neutrophils ; protein ; respiratory

You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary.

See also Understanding Medical Terminology.

References (5 links)

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Reviewed: January 2012
Published: July 7, 2014