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Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

Reviewed August 2007

What is fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a disorder in which muscle tissue and connective tissue such as tendons and ligaments are gradually replaced by bone (ossified), forming bone outside the skeleton (extra-skeletal or heterotopic bone) that constrains movement. This process generally becomes noticeable in early childhood, starting with the neck and shoulders and proceeding down the body and into the limbs.

Extra-skeletal bone formation causes progressive loss of mobility as the joints become affected. Inability to fully open the mouth may cause difficulty in speaking and eating. Over time, people with this disorder may experience malnutrition due to their eating problems. They may also have breathing difficulties as a result of extra bone formation around the rib cage that restricts expansion of the lungs.

Any trauma to the muscles of an individual with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, such as a fall or invasive medical procedures, may trigger episodes of muscle swelling and inflammation (myositis) followed by more rapid ossification in the injured area. Flare-ups may also be caused by viral illnesses such as influenza.

People with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva are generally born with malformed big toes. This abnormality of the big toes is a characteristic feature that helps to distinguish this disorder from other bone and muscle problems. Affected individuals may also have short thumbs and other skeletal abnormalities.

How common is fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is a very rare disorder, believed to occur in approximately 1 in 2 million people worldwide. Several hundred cases have been reported.

What genes are related to fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

Mutations in the ACVR1 gene cause fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

The ACVR1 gene provides instructions for producing a member of a protein family called bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptors. The ACVR1 protein is found in many tissues of the body including skeletal muscle and cartilage. It helps to control the growth and development of the bones and muscles, including the gradual replacement of cartilage by bone (ossification) that occurs in normal skeletal maturation from birth to young adulthood.

Researchers believe that a mutation in the ACVR1 gene may change the shape of the receptor under certain conditions and disrupt mechanisms that control the receptor's activity. As a result, the receptor may be constantly turned on (constitutive activation). Constitutive activation of the receptor causes overgrowth of bone and cartilage and fusion of joints, resulting in the signs and symptoms of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

Read more about the ACVR1 gene.

How do people inherit fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

This condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the disorder.

Most cases of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva result from new mutations in the gene. These cases occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family. In a small number of cases, an affected person has inherited the mutation from one affected parent.

Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

These resources address the diagnosis or management of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva and may include treatment providers.

You might also find information on the diagnosis or management of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in Educational resources and Patient support.

General information about the diagnosis and management of genetic conditions is available in the Handbook. Read more about genetic testing, particularly the difference between clinical tests and research tests.

To locate a healthcare provider, see How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

You may find the following resources about fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva helpful. These materials are written for the general public.

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for healthcare professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

  • Myositis Ossificans
  • Myositis ossificans progressiva
  • Progressive myositis ossificans
  • progressive ossifying myositis

For more information about naming genetic conditions, see the Genetics Home Reference Condition Naming Guidelines and How are genetic conditions and genes named? in the Handbook.

What if I still have specific questions about fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

Where can I find general information about genetic conditions?

What glossary definitions help with understanding fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva?

ankylosis ; autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; bone formation ; cartilage ; cell ; connective tissue ; constitutive ; gene ; inflammation ; inherited ; mutation ; ossification ; protein ; receptor ; skeletal muscle ; tissue ; trauma

You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary.

See also Understanding Medical Terminology.

References (12 links)

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Reviewed: August 2007
Published: October 20, 2014