Skip Navigation
Genetics Home Reference: your guide to understanding genetic conditions About   Site Map   Contact Us
 
Home A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine®
 
 
Printer-friendly version
IL6ST

IL6ST

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

What is the official name of the IL6ST gene?

The official name of this gene is “interleukin 6 signal transducer (gp130, oncostatin M receptor).”

IL6ST is the gene's official symbol. The IL6ST gene is also known by other names, listed below.

Read more about gene names and symbols on the About page.

What is the normal function of the IL6ST gene?

From NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

The protein encoded by this gene is a signal transducer shared by many cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL6), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and oncostatin M (OSM). This protein functions as a part of the cytokine receptor complex. The activation of this protein is dependent upon the binding of cytokines to their receptors. vIL6, a protein related to IL6 and encoded by the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, can bypass the interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) and directly activate this protein. Knockout studies in mice suggest that this gene plays a critical role in regulating myocyte apoptosis. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding distinct isoforms have been described. A related pseudogene has been identified on chromosome 17. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2010]

From UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

Signal-transducing molecule. The receptor systems for IL6, LIF, OSM, CNTF, IL11, CTF1 and BSF3 can utilize gp130 for initiating signal transmission. Binds to IL6/IL6R (alpha chain) complex, resulting in the formation of high-affinity IL6 binding sites, and transduces the signal. Does not bind IL6. May have a role in embryonic development (By similarity). The type I OSM receptor is capable of transducing OSM-specific signaling events.

How are changes in the IL6ST gene related to health conditions?

Genetics Home Reference provides information about rheumatoid arthritis, which is associated with changes in the IL6ST gene.
UniProt and NCBI Gene cite these articles in OMIM, a catalog designed for genetics professionals and researchers that provides detailed information about genetic conditions and genes.
 Article
Number
Main Topic

Where is the IL6ST gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 5q11.2

Molecular Location on chromosome 5: base pairs 55,935,094 to 55,994,992

The IL6ST gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 5 at position 11.2.

The IL6ST gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 5 at position 11.2.

More precisely, the IL6ST gene is located from base pair 55,935,094 to base pair 55,994,992 on chromosome 5.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about IL6ST?

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for genetics professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for the IL6ST gene or gene products?

  • CD130
  • CDW130
  • GP130
  • IL-6RB

Where can I find general information about genes?

The Handbook provides basic information about genetics in clear language.

These links provide additional genetics resources that may be useful.

What glossary definitions help with understanding IL6ST?

apoptosis ; chromosome ; cytokine ; embryonic ; gene ; isoforms ; leukemia ; molecule ; protein ; pseudogene ; receptor ; sarcoma ; transcript

You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary.

See also Understanding Medical Terminology.

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Published: April 7, 2014