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REL

REL

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

What is the official name of the REL gene?

The official name of this gene is “v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog.”

REL is the gene's official symbol. The REL gene is also known by other names, listed below.

Read more about gene names and symbols on the About page.

What is the normal function of the REL gene?

From NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

This gene encodes a protein that belongs to the Rel homology domain/immunoglobulin-like fold, plexin, transcription factor (RHD/IPT) family. Members of this family regulate genes involved in apoptosis, inflammation, the immune response, and oncogenic processes. This proto-oncogene plays a role in the survival and proliferation of B lymphocytes. Mutation or amplification of this gene is associated with B-cell lymphomas, including Hodgkin's lymphoma. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in this gene are associated with susceptibility to ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms. [provided by RefSeq, Apr 2014]

From UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

Proto-oncogene that may play a role in differentiation and lymphopoiesis. NF-kappa-B is a pleiotropic transcription factor which is present in almost all cell types and is involved in many biological processed such as inflammation, immunity, differentiation, cell growth, tumorigenesis and apoptosis. NF-kappa-B is a homo- or heterodimeric complex formed by the Rel-like domain-containing proteins RELA/p65, RELB, NFKB1/p105, NFKB1/p50, REL and NFKB2/p52. The dimers bind at kappa-B sites in the DNA of their target genes and the individual dimers have distinct preferences for different kappa-B sites that they can bind with distinguishable affinity and specificity. Different dimer combinations act as transcriptional activators or repressors, respectively. NF-kappa-B is controlled by various mechanisms of post-translational modification and subcellular compartmentalization as well as by interactions with other cofactors or corepressors. NF-kappa-B complexes are held in the cytoplasm in an inactive state complexed with members of the NF-kappa-B inhibitor (I-kappa-B) family. In a conventional activation pathway, I-kappa-B is phosphorylated by I-kappa-B kinases (IKKs) in response to different activators, subsequently degraded thus liberating the active NF-kappa-B complex which translocates to the nucleus. The NF-kappa-B heterodimer RELA/p65-c-Rel is a transcriptional activator.

How are changes in the REL gene related to health conditions?

Genetics Home Reference provides information about rheumatoid arthritis, which is associated with changes in the REL gene.
UniProt and NCBI Gene cite these articles in OMIM, a catalog designed for genetics professionals and researchers that provides detailed information about genetic conditions and genes.
 Article
Number
Main Topic

Where is the REL gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 2p13-p12

Molecular Location on chromosome 2: base pairs 60,881,573 to 60,944,283

The REL gene is located on the short (p) arm of chromosome 2 between positions 13 and 12.

The REL gene is located on the short (p) arm of chromosome 2 between positions 13 and 12.

More precisely, the REL gene is located from base pair 60,881,573 to base pair 60,944,283 on chromosome 2.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about REL?

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for genetics professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for the REL gene or gene products?

  • C-Rel

Where can I find general information about genes?

The Handbook provides basic information about genetics in clear language.

These links provide additional genetics resources that may be useful.

What glossary definitions help with understanding REL?

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Published: October 20, 2014