Skip Navigation
Genetics Home Reference: your guide to understanding genetic conditions
http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/     A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine®

SPG11

Reviewed August 2012

What is the official name of the SPG11 gene?

The official name of this gene is “spastic paraplegia 11 (autosomal recessive).”

SPG11 is the gene's official symbol. The SPG11 gene is also known by other names, listed below.

What is the normal function of the SPG11 gene?

The SPG11 gene provides instructions for making the protein spatacsin. Spatacsin is active (expressed) throughout the nervous system, although its exact function is unknown. Researchers speculate that it may help control the activity of particular genes (gene expression) or play a role in the transport (trafficking) of proteins. Spatacsin may also be involved in the maintenance of axons, which are specialized extensions of nerve cells (neurons) that transmit impulses throughout the nervous system.

How are changes in the SPG11 gene related to health conditions?

spastic paraplegia type 11 - caused by mutations in the SPG11 gene

More than 65 mutations in the SPG11 gene have been found to cause spastic paraplegia type 11. Most of these mutations change the structure of the spatacsin protein. The effect that the altered spatacsin protein has on the nervous system is not known. Researchers suggest that mutations in spatacsin may cause the signs and symptoms of spastic paraplegia type 11 by interfering with the protein's proposed role in the maintenance of axons.

Where is the SPG11 gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 15q14

Molecular Location on chromosome 15: base pairs 44,562,695 to 44,663,677

The SPG11 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 15 at position 14.

The SPG11 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 15 at position 14.

More precisely, the SPG11 gene is located from base pair 44,562,695 to base pair 44,663,677 on chromosome 15.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/howgeneswork/genelocation) in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about SPG11?

You and your healthcare professional may find the following resources about SPG11 helpful.

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for genetics professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for the SPG11 gene or gene products?

  • FLJ21439
  • KIAA1840
  • SPATACSIN
  • SPTCS_HUMAN

See How are genetic conditions and genes named? (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/mutationsanddisorders/naming) in the Handbook.

What glossary definitions help with understanding SPG11?

autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; axons ; expressed ; gene ; gene expression ; nervous system ; paraplegia ; protein ; recessive ; sclerosis

You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary (http://www.ghr.nlm.nih.gov/glossary).

References

  • Denora PS, Schlesinger D, Casali C, Kok F, Tessa A, Boukhris A, Azzedine H, Dotti MT, Bruno C, Truchetto J, Biancheri R, Fedirko E, Di Rocco M, Bueno C, Malandrini A, Battini R, Sickl E, de Leva MF, Boespflug-Tanguy O, Silvestri G, Simonati A, Said E, Ferbert A, Criscuolo C, Heinimann K, Modoni A, Weber P, Palmeri S, Plasilova M, Pauri F, Cassandrini D, Battisti C, Pini A, Tosetti M, Hauser E, Masciullo M, Di Fabio R, Piccolo F, Denis E, Cioni G, Massa R, Della Giustina E, Calabrese O, Melone MA, De Michele G, Federico A, Bertini E, Durr A, Brockmann K, van der Knaap MS, Zatz M, Filla A, Brice A, Stevanin G, Santorelli FM. Screening of ARHSP-TCC patients expands the spectrum of SPG11 mutations and includes a large scale gene deletion. Hum Mutat. 2009 Mar;30(3):E500-19. doi: 10.1002/humu.20945. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19105190?dopt=Abstract)
  • Hehr U, Bauer P, Winner B, Schule R, Olmez A, Koehler W, Uyanik G, Engel A, Lenz D, Seibel A, Hehr A, Ploetz S, Gamez J, Rolfs A, Weis J, Ringer TM, Bonin M, Schuierer G, Marienhagen J, Bogdahn U, Weber BH, Topaloglu H, Schols L, Riess O, Winkler J. Long-term course and mutational spectrum of spatacsin-linked spastic paraplegia. Ann Neurol. 2007 Dec;62(6):656-65. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18067136?dopt=Abstract)
  • NCBI Gene (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/80208)
  • OMIM: SPG11 GENE (http://omim.org/entry/610844)
  • Paisan-Ruiz C, Dogu O, Yilmaz A, Houlden H, Singleton A. SPG11 mutations are common in familial cases of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. Neurology. 2008 Apr 15;70(16 Pt 2):1384-9. doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000294327.66106.3d. Epub 2008 Mar 12. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18337587?dopt=Abstract)
  • Paisan-Ruiz C, Nath P, Wood NW, Singleton A, Houlden H. Clinical heterogeneity and genotype-phenotype correlations in hereditary spastic paraplegia because of Spatacsin mutations (SPG11). Eur J Neurol. 2008 Oct;15(10):1065-70. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-1331.2008.02247.x. Epub 2008 Aug 20. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18717728?dopt=Abstract)
  • Stevanin G, Azzedine H, Denora P, Boukhris A, Tazir M, Lossos A, Rosa AL, Lerer I, Hamri A, Alegria P, Loureiro J, Tada M, Hannequin D, Anheim M, Goizet C, Gonzalez-Martinez V, Le Ber I, Forlani S, Iwabuchi K, Meiner V, Uyanik G, Erichsen AK, Feki I, Pasquier F, Belarbi S, Cruz VT, Depienne C, Truchetto J, Garrigues G, Tallaksen C, Tranchant C, Nishizawa M, Vale J, Coutinho P, Santorelli FM, Mhiri C, Brice A, Durr A; SPATAX consortium. Mutations in SPG11 are frequent in autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum, cognitive decline and lower motor neuron degeneration. Brain. 2008 Mar;131(Pt 3):772-84. Epub 2007 Dec 13. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18079167?dopt=Abstract)
  • Stevanin G, Santorelli FM, Azzedine H, Coutinho P, Chomilier J, Denora PS, Martin E, Ouvrard-Hernandez AM, Tessa A, Bouslam N, Lossos A, Charles P, Loureiro JL, Elleuch N, Confavreux C, Cruz VT, Ruberg M, Leguern E, Grid D, Tazir M, Fontaine B, Filla A, Bertini E, Durr A, Brice A. Mutations in SPG11, encoding spatacsin, are a major cause of spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum. Nat Genet. 2007 Mar;39(3):366-72. Epub 2007 Feb 18. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17322883?dopt=Abstract)

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/consult/findingprofessional) in the Handbook.

 
Reviewed: August 2012
Published: July 14, 2014