Skip Navigation
Genetics Home Reference: your guide to understanding genetic conditions About   Site Map   Contact Us
 
Home A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine®
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q-R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y-Z

Tuberculosis

Synonym(s)

  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection
  • TB

Definition(s)

A chronic, recurrent infection caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis (TB) may affect almost any tissue or organ of the body with the lungs being the most common site of infection. The clinical stages of TB are primary or initial infection, latent or dormant infection, and recrudescent or adult-type TB. Ninety to 95% of primary TB infections may go unrecognized. Histopathologically, tissue lesions consist of granulomas which usually undergo central caseation necrosis. Local symptoms of TB vary according to the part affected; acute symptoms include hectic fever, sweats, and emaciation; serious complications include granulomatous erosion of pulmonary bronchi associated with hemoptysis. If untreated, progressive TB may be associated with a high degree of mortality. This infection is frequently observed in immunocompromised individuals with AIDS or a history of illicit IV drug use.

Definition from: NCI Thesaurus via Unified Medical Language SystemThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. at the National Library of Medicine

A disease caused by a specific type of bacteria that spreads from one person to another through the air. Tuberculosis can affect many parts of the body, but most often affects the lungs. A person may not have symptoms of tuberculosis for years, but they may appear when the patient becomes ill with a serious condition like diabetes, AIDS, or cancer. Tuberculosis can usually be treated and cured with antibiotics. Also called TB.

Definition from:  National Cancer Institute dictionaryThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.

See also Understanding Medical Terminology.

 
Published: October 20, 2014