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What are reduced penetrance and variable expressivity?

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Reduced penetrance and variable expressivity are factors that influence the effects of particular genetic changes. These factors usually affect disorders that have an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, although they are occasionally seen in disorders with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern.

Reduced penetrance

Penetrance refers to the proportion of people with a particular genetic change (such as a mutation in a specific gene) who exhibit signs and symptoms of a genetic disorder. If some people with the mutation do not develop features of the disorder, the condition is said to have reduced (or incomplete) penetrance. Reduced penetrance often occurs with familial cancer syndromes. For example, many people with a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene will develop cancer during their lifetime, but some people will not. Doctors cannot predict which people with these mutations will develop cancer or when the tumors will develop.

Reduced penetrance probably results from a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors, many of which are unknown. This phenomenon can make it challenging for genetics professionals to interpret a person’s family medical history and predict the risk of passing a genetic condition to future generations.

Variable expressivity

Although some genetic disorders exhibit little variation, most have signs and symptoms that differ among affected individuals. Variable expressivity refers to the range of signs and symptoms that can occur in different people with the same genetic condition. For example, the features of Marfan syndrome vary widely— some people have only mild symptoms (such as being tall and thin with long, slender fingers), while others also experience life-threatening complications involving the heart and blood vessels. Although the features are highly variable, most people with this disorder have a mutation in the same gene ( FBN1).

As with reduced penetrance, variable expressivity is probably caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors, most of which have not been identified. If a genetic condition has highly variable signs and symptoms, it may be challenging to diagnose.

For more information about reduced penetrance and variable expressivity:

The PHG Foundation offers an interactive tutorial on penetranceThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. that explains the differences between reduced penetrance and variable expressivity.

The Education Portal provides a detailed discussion of penetrance and expressivityThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference..

Additional information about penetrance and expressivityThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. is available from the Merck Manual Home Health Handbook for Patients & Caregivers.

A more in-depth explanation of these concepts is available from the textbook Human Molecular Genetics 2 in chapter 3.2, Complications to the Basic Pedigree PatternsThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference..


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Published: November 24, 2014