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Can changes in the number of chromosomes affect health and development?

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Human cells normally contain 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46 chromosomes in each cell (illustration). A change in the number of chromosomes can cause problems with growth, development, and function of the body’s systems. These changes can occur during the formation of reproductive cells (eggs and sperm), in early fetal development, or in any cell after birth. A gain or loss of chromosomes from the normal 46 is called aneuploidy.

A common form of aneuploidy is trisomy, or the presence of an extra chromosome in cells. “Tri-” is Greek for “three”; people with trisomy have three copies of a particular chromosome in cells instead of the normal two copies. Down syndrome is an example of a condition caused by trisomy (illustration).  People with Down syndrome typically have three copies of chromosome 21 in each cell, for a total of 47 chromosomes per cell.

Monosomy, or the loss of one chromosome in cells, is another kind of aneuploidy. “Mono-” is Greek for “one”; people with monosomy have one copy of a particular chromosome in cells instead of the normal two copies. Turner syndrome is a condition caused by monosomy (illustration). Women with Turner syndrome usually have only one copy of the X chromosome in every cell, for a total of 45 chromosomes per cell.

Rarely, some cells end up with complete extra sets of chromosomes.  Cells with one additional set of chromosomes, for a total of 69 chromosomes, are called triploid (illustration).  Cells with two additional sets of chromosomes, for a total of 92 chromosomes, are called tetraploid.  A condition in which every cell in the body has an extra set of chromosomes is not compatible with life.

In some cases, a change in the number of chromosomes occurs only in certain cells.  When an individual has two or more cell populations with a different chromosomal makeup, this situation is called chromosomal mosaicism (illustration).  Chromosomal mosaicism occurs from an error in cell division in cells other than eggs and sperm. Most commonly, some cells end up with one extra or missing chromosome (for a total of 45 or 47 chromosomes per cell), while other cells have the usual 46 chromosomes. Mosaic Turner syndrome is one example of chromosomal mosaicism.  In females with this condition, some cells have 45 chromosomes because they are missing one copy of the X chromosome, while other cells have the usual number of chromosomes.

Many cancer cells also have changes in their number of chromosomes. These changes are not inherited; they occur in somatic cells (cells other than eggs or sperm) during the formation or progression of a cancerous tumor.

For more information about chromosomal disorders:

A discussion of how chromosomal abnormalities happenThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. is provided by the National Human Genome Research Institute.

The Centre for Genetics Education offers a fact sheet about changes in chromosome number or sizeThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference..

Information about chromosomal changesThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference., including changes in the number of chromosomes, is available from EuroGentest.

The University of Leicester’s Virtual Genetics Education Center provides an explanation of numerical chromosome aberrationsThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference..

The National Organization for Rare Disorders offers an overview of triploid syndromeThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference..

Chromosomal MosaicismThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference., a web site provided by the University of British Columbia, offers detailed information about mosaic chromosomal abnormalities.

MedlinePlus offers an encyclopedia article about chromosomal mosaicismThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference..


Next: Can changes in the structure of chromosomes affect health and development?

 
Published: September 15, 2014